I had to laugh when I went searching for this title and saw it searched on as One Up On The Wall Street PDF.   The actual title is One Up On Wall Street and you can’t get it on pdf.

And if you don’t have One Up On Wall Street in your trader’s library, you should!

Peter Lynch was manager of Fidelity’s Magellan Fund, which was raking up significant gains.  This made him a legend in the mutual fund industry.  When most people get into stocks, they take a fundamental approach.  This book takes a practical approach.  I.e. if you see a store that’s always crowded at the mall, then you should look into their stock…

Click the following link to learn more.

One Up On Wall Street : How To Use What You Already Know To Make Money In The Market

Lynch believes that each individual has enough inherent knowledge and experience to be a successful investor.  He provides down-to-earth investing advice.  He teaches investors:

1. To take advantage of what you already know – products you may already use – and simple observations usually pay off

2. You don’t need to be a Wall Street analyst to uncover great investment opportunities

3. You are not disadvantaged vs. large, institutional investors

4. You don’t have to accurately predict the stock market to make money in stocks

5. To keep an open mind to new ideas

This is a good read and a book that you should have in your library if  you’re going to be in the stock market.  Again, click the link below to get your copy now.

One Up On Wall Street : How To Use What You Already Know To Make Money In The Market

Stock Barometer

My clients and students are always asking me what trading books did I read that made me a great trader.

As a trader, which I believe trading is a life long learning process, there were several books that I read which took me along what I call the traders learning curve.  You see, no one starts out a trader.  They normally start as a mutual fund investor and then become a stock investor and then become a trader.  Here are the books I would recommend someone read – and the primary take away from the book to take them from newbie investor/trader to somewhat experienced trader .

Peter Lynch was manager of Fidelity’s Magellan Fund, which was raking up significant gains.  This made him a legend in the mutual fund industry.  When most people get into stocks, they take a fundamental approach.  This book takes a practical approach.  I.e. if you see a store that’s always crowded at the mall, then you should look into their stock…

One Up On Wall Street : How To Use What You Already Know To Make Money In The Market

Benjamin Graham’s name is synonymous with value investing.  Traders first explore all avenues of investing before they migrate to trading.  This book will do a lot to discourage trading (or speculating).   If you still want to trade after reading it, you’re ready for the next step.

The Intelligent Investor: The Definitive Book on Value Investing. A Book of Practical Counsel (Revised Edition)

The next book stems out of William J. O’neil’s Newspaper, Investor’s Business Daily.  I do not recommend you subscribe to the newspaper or the online version.  It is very expensive and you only need one copy periodically to get what you need.  But what I do recommend is Bill’s book – it will help you make the leap from fundamental analysis to trading.  It helped me.

The How to Make Money in Stocks Complete Investing System: Your Ultimate Guide to Winning in Good Times and Bad

This next book, originally published back in 1923,  helped me understand one thing – that human nature never changes.  As I moved along the traders experience curve, I moved deeply into reading human nature (and my own), because I have found that it is the one thing over time never changes.

Reminiscences of a Stock Operator Annotated Edition

The next book, by John J. Murphy, really got me looking more at charts and made me realize I am a visual creature.  I need to see something to believe it.  That has creeped into my own nature.  I don’t trust anything anyone says unless they can show me (or I can measure it or validate it myself).  So many people say so much that can’t be validated.

The Visual Investor: How to Spot Market Trends (Wiley Trading)

Jack Schwager’s book showed me that there are many ways to make money in the markets.  It’s the people that find these opportunities before others that are the ones that make the most money.  I’m always on the look out for things that they’re not talking about on CNBC.

Stock Market Wizards: Interviews with America’s Top Stock Traders

I found ToniTurner’s book to be very entertaining and many of the ideas presented in it are utilized in my own trading.  I believe all traders and even investors should understand day trading, because it drives so much of the market.  This book opens the door to that understanding.

A Beginner’s Guide to Day Trading Online (2nd edition)

Larry McMillan’s book on options is the bible.  Sometimes it may read like the bible, but if you trade options, and haven’t read this, you are missing something that will cost you 10x the amount of this book.

McMillan on Options, Second Edition (Wiley Trading)

Bob Prechter’s book takes everything you know to the next level.  This is where I was introduced to fibonacci (not the man, but how it’s utilized in trading).  If you can master this, you can master the markets.  The only issue I have with EW is that these guys misread the market all the time and readjust their forecasts in hindsight.  Hindsight is a bad word in trading.  Anyone can look at a chart and see where they’ve been, it takes a true trader to be able to look ahead and predict where we’re going.  This is a great tool to get you there.

Elliott Wave Principle: Key To Market Behavior

Back when I started trading, Steve Nison was credited with bringing candlestick trading to the west.  Now, it’s everywhere and in practically every charting software, you can see things in candles.  It’s a language that you need to know if you are going to be a trader.  And by the way, I spent a few years of my life as ‘The Samurai Stock Trader” and candles were my weapon of choice.  This is a good book to get you there and it looks good on your coffee table.

Japanese Candlestick Charting Techniques, Second Edition

Joe Dinapoli is not a name I hear much about anymore.  But back in the day, he wrote this book.  It’s a very expensive book basically because it gives away some of his secrets and he makes enough money not to really need to drive more sales by lowering the price.   What I leaned from this was the idea of ‘confluence’ and for a period I was also utilizing his 3×3 displaced moving average.    It’s another coffee table book,l and if you have the money, I’d suggest you get it.

Trading with DiNapoli Levels: The Practical Application of Fibonacci Analysis to Investment Markets

Again, my reasoning for providing this list is to give you an idea of what books you can read to help you along your learning curve.  And while I’ve read all of these and probably 100 more, you can get most of these books for under $100 in total and it would be a good way to get started in your journey as a trader.